His Highness Shaikh Rashid Al-Maktoum Pakistani School,Dubai

Professional development

Process of improving and increasing capabilities of staff through access to education and training opportunities in the workplace, through outside organization, or through watching others perform the job. It helps administrators, teachers, and other educators to improve their professional knowledge, competence, skill, and effectiveness Developing teachers is central to improving student learning and achievement. Great teachers inspire and motivate great students. Whatever the teaching style or emergent theory within our teacher development program, it wants to improve the pedagogy of participants, as learners, to produce results beyond expectations. The roles and expectations for teachers have changed in this 21st century. Teachers continuously face challenges, such as the need for planning, assessment, differentiation, communicating with parents, behavior management, technology and working collaboratively with colleagues to share best practice.
 This professional aims to enhance and transform their educational pedagogy and systems to prepare all young people with the knowledge and skills needed to function in a rapidly changing world. Professional development opportunities can range from a single workshop to a semester-long academic course, to services offered by a medley of different professional development providers and varying widely with respect to the philosophy, content, and format of the learning. In recent years, state and national policies have focused more attention on the issue of “teacher quality”—i.e., the ability of individual teachers or a teaching faculty to improve student learning and meet expected standards for performance. The No Child Left Behind Act, for example, provides a formal definition of what constitutes high-quality professional development and requires schools to report the percentage of their teaching faculty that meet the law’s definition of a “highly qualified teacher.” The law maintains that professional development should take the form of a “comprehensive, sustained, and intensive approach to improving teachers’ and principals’ effectiveness in raising student achievement.” Similar policies that describe professional-development expectations or require teachers to meet certain expectations for professional development may be in place at the state, district, and school levels across the country, although the design and purpose of these policies may vary widely from place to place.
Generally speaking, professional development is considered to be the primary mechanism that schools can use to help teachers continuously learn and improve their skills over time. And in recent decades, the topic has been extensively researched and many strategies and initiatives have been developed to improve the quality and effectiveness of professional development for educators. While theories about professional development abound, a degree of consensus has emerged on some of the major features of effective professional development. For example, one-day workshops or conferences that are not directly connected to a school’s academic program, or to what teachers are teaching, are generally considered to be less effective than training and learning opportunities that are sustained over longer periods of time and directly connected to what schools and teachers are actually doing on a daily basis.
While few educators would argue against the need for and importance of professional development The teachers feel that it is irrelevant to their teaching needs and day-to-day professional responsibilities, among many other possible causes. The teachers feel that it is irrelevant to their teaching needs and day-to-day professional responsibilities, among many other possible causes. Some schools could have access to more professional-development funding than they can reasonably use in a given year, while other schools and teachers may be expected to fund most or all of their professional development on their own. Other common challenges include insufficient support for professional development from the administrative leadership, a lack of faculty interest or motivation, or overburdened teacher workloads.
                                                                                         Mrs Farah Naseem

 

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